Women in Tech Archives

Rants of a Gamer Girl: Feminist Gamer Bingo!

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Because I’m a gamer, I spend a lot of time reading reviews, blog posts, and articles about video games.  However whenever media critical thought or even gender enters the conversation, the same comments keep appearing.  So frequently in fact, that I felt it was worthy of it’s own bingo card.  Feel free to repost the above bingo card, but if you do so, link back to this page and give credit.

Scott Adams discussion thread

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Apparently the Internet noticed today that Scott Adams (creator of Dilbert) had posted a dubious post about men’s rights and then deleted it. In anticipation of my inbox being filled overnight with people asking about it, I’m just going to post this discussion thread here and you can all get started on your own while I continue in my plan to curl up with a book and stay off the Internet for a while.

New Video Game Features "Babe-Slapping" Mode

From: discoverfeminism.com |

What’s better than a good ol’ game of Capture the Flag? According to the makers of the video game Duke Nukem Forever, a misogynistic high tech version called Capture the Babe. The Duke is no stranger to controversy. The last version of the game, which came out in 1995, featured a button the player could push to force women in the game to bare their breasts. Classy.

Rants of a Gamer Girl: Duke Nukem – Smack My Chick Up

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Following the incredibly sexist strip-club press event held for the release of the upcoming video game, Duke Nukem Forever, I thought we had finally hit rock bottom.  I was wrong. This week, developer Gearbox Software announced the multiplayer options that will be available in the latest installment of the franchise,, including a spin on “Capture the Flag”, titled “Capture the Babe.”  Rather than trying to steal another team’s actual flag or taking an enemy captive, the objective is to “capture” a woman.

MIT Releases Third Study On Status Of Women Science and Engineering Faculty

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Today, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology releases a report examining the status of women faculty in science and engineering, the third such report since 1999. The upshot: There’s progress, but more needs to be done. The number of women faculty in science has grown from 32 to 50 in science and from 32 to 60 in engineering. Women in both schools feel more included, but point out that child care, for example, is still a “woman’s issue.” More here from the MIT website and here from The Scientist blog.

Celebrating Women’s History Month: Challenging Scientific Sexism in the 18th Century and Today

From: discoverfeminism.com |

How does society try to explain “the feminine”? What “science” does it use? Wikipedia has a whole section on male vs. female brains. It doesn’t tell you all that much though because almost everything it says is either a hypothesis, or is contradicted or mitigated by the next sentence (apparently there have been lots of different studies). Or remember that whole Men are From Mars and Women are From Venus thing? In 2007 The Myth of Mars and Venus was published, which argued basically that the Mars/Venus difference is bullshit. And the statistics that boys are better at math than girls—there was that study that girls do worse on math tests because they are expected to (or when they are “ogled“).

Wednesday Geek Woman bonus submissions thread (March)

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Wednesday Geek Woman is like Ada Lovelace Day every week! Most of our submissions are by guest posters, and we’ll have a post like this once a month to allow you to submit women to the series. Submit your profile of a geek woman in (hidden) comments here and selected ones will be posted (perhaps lightly edited) on Wednesdays. Here’s what to include:

Wednesday Geek Woman: Hedy Lamarr, inventor

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Although known chiefly as an actress, Hedy Lamarr was a keen inventor and mathematician who was interested in military technology. Her neighbour was the composer George Antheil who was experimenting with automated musical instruments such as player pianos. Together they developed a system based on the perforations on player piano rolls, where a signal could switch between multiple frequencies to make radio controlled object such as torpedoes harder for the enemy to jam or detect. The patent was applied for in 1941 and was designed to assist the US military as a secret communication system, but it wasn’t put into use until the Cuba blockade of 1962.

The Fourteen Not Forgotten and Sexist Posters at Waterloo

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Recent events at my alma mater, the University of Waterloo, have left a bad taste in my mouth. In mid-February, in the middle of student government elections, someone covered up the posters of female candidates with an image of Marie Curie, a nuclear explosion and the following slogan “The brightest woman this Earth ever created was Marie Curie, The mother of the nuclear bomb. You tell me if the plan of women leading men is still a good idea!” A poster with the same image was also put up with similarly alarming text: Kill 250 000 innocent Japanese in WW2 and is given 2 Nobel Prizes. Expose the defective Moral Intelligence of Womankind and it is called Sexism. It had the caption: “Marie Curie = evil”.

Census of women in open technology and culture opens

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Over at my day job at the Ada Initiative, we just launched a census of women in open technology and culture. From the blog post:

Wednesday Geek Woman: Sasha Aikhenvald, specialist in linguistic typology

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Sasha (Alexandra) Aikhenvald was born to a Jewish family in Moscow in 1957. The environment at the time was not helpful to Dr Aikhenvald in her ambitions. Interest in languages other than Russian was not encouraged, and as a Jewish person Dr Aikhenvald faced many limits and discrimination. Yet, as she says in an interview with ABC radio, “I am stubborn, so in spite of all the difficulties the Soviets confronted me with, I did make an effort to develop myself intellectually.”

SCIENCE GRRL: Let’s talk about “choice” in the sciences, shall we?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

So read the headline that summed up a few weeks of articles, blog posts and opinion pieces on Stephen J. Ceci and Wendy M. Williams’ article, Understanding current causes of women’s underrepresentation in science. And that’s the conclusion I would come to as well if I didn’t understand that you can’t examine the issue of underrepresentation of women in the sciences by comparing women and men with equal resources to each other. Because part of the issue with the lack of women in the sciences is that resources are not distributed equally.

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