Women around the world Archives

The Effect of Climate Change on Girls in Developing Countries

From: discoverfeminism.com |

It seems that both in and out of the scientific community there’s debate as to the legitimacy and/or severity of the global warming phenomenon: does it really exist, how bad will it get, should we really be worried, etc. But regardless of your stance on the issue, an awareness of how climate change — including natural disasters — can and will affect people around the world is a real issue, and recently, researchers have begun studying the significant and varied effects of climate-related phenomenon on women in particular.

Teta, Mother and Me: Three Generations of Arab Women

From: discoverfeminism.com |

  I’ve had the Feministe audience at the back of my mind (even when working on material that hasn’t seemed an easy fit for a blog devoted to discussions of feminism) since starting my guest gig here last week — which is to say, even when I wrote my Israel/Palestine-I-was-on-Russian-TV! post, as well as yesterday’s “Norway and terrorism as a daily event.” My professional life has only rarely overlapped with my advocacy for women, and sometimes it’s hard to hit both sweet spots.

Is foreign aid killing women?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The New York Times, reporting on the devastating statistics on maternal death in Uganda, pointed to some important unintended side effects of foreign aid, namely that it decreases the spending and effectiveness of local health care:

‘SlutWalks’ Spread to India

From: discoverfeminism.com |

In April, women and men started taking to the streets in Canada and the United States to protest sexual harassment and sexual violence against women. These “SlutWalks” — which the DF posted about here — began as a reaction against a Canadian police officer who told a class at York University that “women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.” To combat that flagrant slut-shaming and victim-blaming, SlutWalk participants dressed in revealing get-ups and marched en masse.

Sexual Assault in Dadaab: Trauma doesn’t stop at the Somali-Kenyan border

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The images and stories that have been coming out of Somalia and the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya are heartbreaking. Famine. War. Leaving friends, family and what little remains behind. Even from the refugee camp, we hear stories of relief workers having to decide who gets food or doctors having to decide who gets medicine—necessary decisions, but decisions that mean life or death for many.

“Normal never got any of us anywhere”

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Ivan Coyote has a great column at the Canadian paper Xtra, in response to a woman who emailed to tell her:

American Call to End Saudi Ban on Women Drivers Intensifies

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Women in Saudi Arabia began actively protesting against the country’s ban on female drivers since May.  I posted about their Women2Drive initiative spearheaded by 32-year-old Manal al-Sharif, and since then, American women have joined in the effort as well. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged the Saudi foreign minister to press the government to end the driving ban in June. Now, 14 female U.S. senators have also publicly called for Saudi Arabia to let women get behind the wheel already.

Nadia Al-Sakkaf and Yemen’s ongoing fight

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Check out the editor of the Yemen Times, Nadia Al-Sakkaf, talking with Paley Center President Pat Michell at TEDGlobal, about uprising, the power of the press, and women’s ingenuity. As TED explains: “Al-Sakkaf’s independent, English-language paper is vital for sharing news–and for sharing a new vision of Yemen and of that country’s women as equal partners in work and change.”

Bad-Ass Woman of the Day: Ms. Alanis from Monterrey

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Colorlines points out this incredible act of bravery in Monterrey, Mexico where a kindergarten teacher calmed her 15 students during a shootout outside of the school:

Canadian Launches Petition Against Segregation of Menstruating Girls in Public School

From: discoverfeminism.com |

"My concern is the Toronto District School Board (is) using tax money to tell girls that they are second-class citizens," Tarek Fatah, founder of the Muslim Canadian Congress, told the Toronto Sun. He's talking about the District's decision to allow a Muslim Friday prayer session in the Valley Park Middle School cafeteria, where it forces girls to sit behind the boys, and sends menstruating girls to the back where they can only listen, but not participate.

Afghan Women Breaking Ground in Air Force

From: discoverfeminism.com |

For some women in some parts of Afghanistan, great changes are happening: girls are going to school, women work in offices and by next year, four young women could be among their country’s first females piloting military helicopters.

Women make the cut in Accra, Ghana

From: discoverfeminism.com |

In a recent Loop21 article, Llanor Alleyne discusses the fear imposed on her when she decided to embrace a Caesaresque coif:

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