Women and Religion Archives

Today’s Badass: Elizabeth Warren

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I am reluctant to get on the politician-as-savior bandwagon. Actually, these folks are mere mortals. And I firmly believe that if we expect them to be more ideologically pure, or just plain better than the rest of us, we’re begging to be deceived. That being said, the way she handled this moment made me dig Elizabeth Warren more than I already did. From HuffPo:

Black Feminist Love and Amber Cole

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The last time I was speechless after seeing images of a young Black woman on the internet was June 2009 when John at The Smoking Section ( a rap blog) posted what were then believed to be nude images of Rihanna Fenty. I contacted him and asked him why he did it, we had a conversation, and he then refused to give me permission to blog about the conversation. To this day, I still find it problematic that he published what is believed to be images of singer Rihanna Fenty. I always ask permission to write about conversations. Consent. Get it?

“From Cleopatra Jones to First Lady Michelle Obama: Exploring Feminism in Film & Media”

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The 14th Annual Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival will take place this coming weekend in Brooklyn, New York.  Here’s an overview:

Who is our Harijan?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Happy Birthday, Gandhiji.  October 2, 1869 our lives were changed forever.  Not that Mohandas arrived fully enlisted in the liberation movement.  He was privileged, wore western clothes, studied in London.  He wandered British society looking for non-meat eaters and found a group of Russian mystics and self-proclaimed magicians.  He was in training to be a barrister and his interest in women’s rights brought him to Royal Albert Hall to hear Mrs. Pankhurst talk about suffrage and direct action.  He sat in the same audience as Alice Paul and, even then, his sensibility was to leave when violence was promoted.  Breaking windows was going too far for Mohan.

The Feministing Five: Jean Melesaine

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I met Jean one sunny afternoon while she was in the midst of making this video. New America Media was holding a conference called Children in Poverty, and they wanted Jean to tell her story. Jean is a Pacific Islander, born and raised all over the San Francisco Bay Area and currently residing in the Hunters Point projects. For those unfamiliar with the San Francisco landscape, Bayview-Hunters Point is a segregated portion of the city, where most residents rarely venture. “The Point” represents a stark contrast to the rest of San Francisco’s expensive, predominantly white neighborhoods. A community on the margins, experiencing toxic pollution, unemployment and poverty, Jean calls this place home.

Wangari Maathai, First African Woman to Win Nobel Peace Prize, Dies

From: discoverfeminism.com |

In the course of history, there comes a time when humanity is called to shift to a new level of consciousness,” she said, “to reach a higher moral ground. A time when we have to shed our fear and give hope to each other. That time is now.

Feminist breeders are the nicest people

From: discoverfeminism.com |

As predicted, following the advice of The Feminist Breeder resulted in a large bump in my blog traffic–not because the subjects of Abortion & Menstruation are really that hot, after all, but because TFB has some of the most loyal readers anywhere on the web.  To my great delight, they left comments in abundance, and not simply ones that parroted back my point of view.  In some cases, the comments challenged me directly, but they did so without calling me a “pro-choice whore,” a “matriarchal gynecentrist,” or a homicidal maniac who looms over my children’s beds at night with an icepick.  How refreshing!  Thanks, all!

The Green Belt Movement and Honoring Professor Wangari Muta Maathai

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Okay, wow. I found this webpage on Ms. Mag’s blog only to find out that the Green Belt’s Movement founder passed away yesterday at the age of 71. She died last night at the hospital while fighting cancer. I really can’t believe it. Professor Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize for her Movement. She is an incredible Kenyan woman who had a vision, that Kenya would be full of trees. The lost of trees was the result of white colonialism and white industry. She never stopped helping the many Kenyan women who rely on the environment for survival.

The Feministing Five: Hope Lehman

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I met Hope during our time together in a program called Public Allies, the only social justice-specific AmeriCorps program. It’s clear to anyone that meets Hope that she has a special drive and passion for the work she does. I always joke with her that she reminds me of the Blue Scholars’ song, “No Rest for the Weary.” She’s an artist in every aspect of the word–she paints, draws, does theatre and dances to name a few of her talents. More importantly, however, she makes sure to bring all these sides of her to the youth work she does.

The Fountain and Shrine of The New Yorker: Katherine S. White

From: discoverfeminism.com |

This past Saturday was the 119th anniversary of the birth of Katherine Sergeant Angell White, one of The New Yorker‘s first editors. She began working for the magazine in 1925 and nurtured the talents of many of its best known writers. “She had a fabulous correspondence with them. She mothered them. She was interested in their family life, their sorrows and their horrors,” E.B. White noted in a 1980 New York Times profile. Katherine White is credited with establishing and shaping what we know of as the “New Yorker story”; discovering writers like Thurber, Cheever, Updike, and Nabokov. Katherine White, then Katherine Angell, recommended Harold Ross hire E.B., who went on to become one of the magazine’s greatest assets.

Beauty in Truth: A film about Alice Walker by Patribha Parmar (Interview)

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Alice Walker’s life and work have inspired me, shown me that it’s possible to be a writer and a global citizen with love, spirit, courage and laughter. There’s The Color Purple and Steven Spielberg’s film adaptation, as well as the Broadway musical. And there’s so much more: poems, essays, short stories, novels like Possessing the Secret of Joy—about female genital mutilation—and her latest book, The Chicken Chronicles. So when I heard that Pratibha Parmar of Kali Films was making a documentary about Alice Walker, called Beauty in Truth, I was very excited.

Ester’s Eyes: Returning from Uganda’s War as a Bush Wife

From: discoverfeminism.com |

She wants her face to be seen. It’s not what you might expect—she’s not trying to get justice or retribution. Ester Abeja wants to show her face as a victim of gang rape, of abduction, of torture and daily violence, to be the image of a woman who has been forced to kill her own child and her own people. She wants to be acknowledged. She is a survivor of Uganda’s long-running war, but Abeja knows she is also a symbol.

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