Pop Culture Commentary Archives

New feature: That’s not my name

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Tried changing your name recently? I have - and it's a complete and utter pain. Not just because of all the hoops that some organisations make you jump through. There's the sheer inconsistency of it all as well. Some want marriage certificates, deed polls, divorce papers. Some don't.

Where are you from? Part 7

From: discoverfeminism.com |

That is it, there is no more. Thank you for participating in this project. Writing it certainly helped me to clarify and work through a lot of my thinking and pain around this question, and I feel a lot easier within myself. I hope it was helpful for some of you, too.

The First Gay or Transsexual Caveman??? WHUCK????

From: discoverfeminism.com |

This is one of those "how about that?" stories that makes the rounds on and offline. A gay caveman?? A transsexual caveman?? It appears, verbatim, on about two and half pages--at least--of Google links. Let's do a little bit of cultural anthropological and social-political analysis, shall we? "Caveman" and "gay" and "homosexual" and "transsexual" are all VERY white, Western, Anglo-English terms and concepts. They exist in a time and a place that is more or less "now" and "here" if you live in places where English is a first language, a mother tongue. They are all anti-Indigenous, or woefully ignorant of Indigenous societies and traditions.

I’m A Boy

From: discoverfeminism.com |

My interest in feminism could have started when my mom told me that people “aren’t weird, they’re just different.” It could have started when I was teased in elementary school for having braces or in high school for having overbite. It could have been those journalism classes or seeing how Native people in my high school were treated by my peers. Maybe it was because I had to come out as queer and then again, as a transgender man.

Where are you from? Part 6

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I am thinking about what “where are you from” will mean in my family’s future. I wonder what it means even now, because we’ve all moved around a lot. My family is, by a combination of choice and being forced, as transnational as it gets, but we’ve all got a sense of where we’ve been. What will happen when we get further from those homes as the years go on? Will we belong in those places, or increasingly nowhere?

Where are you from? Part 5

From: discoverfeminism.com |

How do you relate to where you are now? Does it feel like home? Who lets it feel like home? I have lived in this city all my life and it still feels transient. I’ve never quite understood the feeling and rhythm of this city, never known where and how to be and how I might fit in. There are places I’ve visited that feel vastly more like home. Maybe it’s that coldness with which Sydney is so often characterised, or maybe it’s finding that the Australian mainstream likes to alienate people like me, but I never have felt quite settled here.

Where are you from? Part 4

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Where are you now? Is it home? Is it a place you can’t see your way to it being a home? Sometimes identifying a place as where you’re from isn’t just about your personal history there, your associations, and memories, and how well you know it, and how much time you’ve spent there. It can be about whether other people accept you as being from there.

Those things that we are

From: discoverfeminism.com |

There is sometimes an awful temptation, in this struggle against the kyriarchy, to attempt to police oneself or other members of one's group to make them more palatable to the wider society. It can seem as though this is the best way to achieve rights, to achieve a semblance of equality, to reach the light at the end of the tunnel.

The advantage of being me

From: discoverfeminism.com |

From The Advantage Of Dual-Identities (A Case Study of Nabokov), I bring you this quote:

It’s also important to note that the advantage of having a “dual-identity” – being both a novelist and a scientist, for instance – isn’t limited to Nabokov. According to a study led by Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, a psychologist at the University of Michigan, people who describe themselves as both Asian and American, or see themselves as a female engineer (and not just an engineer), consistently display higher levels of creativity.

Single-Twenty-Somethings: WSJ says you are a national calamity

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Single, 20-something men, who are searching for identity: the Wall Street Journal thinks you are a social problem. And ladies—you are only encouraging them. The “social problem” set out for us in Kay Hymowitz’s Wall Street Journal article “Where have the Good Men Gone?” is that educated, single 20-somethings with a job or financial support are living as eternal children. In taking the time they need to develop their identities, to pursue more competitive jobs, and to enjoy being young, they are neglecting what clearly makes everyone happy: a family and children.

My Profuse Apology to Halle Berry

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Last week I was asked to write a column about Halle Berry, her career and recent statements she made in an interview with Ebony magazine for their March 2011 issue. During that interview she made several statements about race. The first was a comment about Halle Berry considering her daughter to be Black because Berry says she follows the "one drop rule."  The second statement was one where Berry declared that she had not abandoned Black people because she dated non-Black men.

The Value of a Name

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Names are important.  They reflect our identity, and so the ability to keep or change them implicates our autonomy.  A recent lawsuit in Japan brings this importance into sharp relief.  There, a group of women filed suit yesterday, challenging a provision of the civil code that stipulates that a wife and husband must share the same last name, almost always that of the husband.

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