Inspirational Feminists Archives

Hollywood Feminist of the Day: Vera Farmiga

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I want to be invited to Vera Farmiga's house when she does one of the burnings described in this piece from The Guardian. It seems that Farmiga burns the scripts she gets that she doesn't like that have crappy female characters on her front lawn. I imagine it has a big singed spot. She's been on the radar since Debra Granik's 2004 film Down to the Bone and hit the big time last year with her Oscar nomination for Up in the Air. She appears this week in Source Code a big budget film that almost got relegated to the

Celebrating Women’s History Month– Indira Gandhi: World Leader or “Witch”?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Just around the corner from my home here in Berlin, the tram stops at the intersection of Berliner Alley and Indira-Gandhi Street. For a long time, whenever the voice in the tram announced “Indira Gandhi Straße,” I thought: “she must have been a really great politician.” That feeling of her “greatness” quietly settled into my subconscious–the very reaction public memorials are supposed to foster in the first place. Mission Public Remembrance Accomplished. Woman’s History Month finally got me to take a real look at Gandhi’s story. I’m really glad I did, because Gandhi’s story is a complicated, shocking and unsettling chapter in women’s history.

Women’s History: Bicycling Toward Emancipation

From: discoverfeminism.com |

It’s springtime, which means it’s the season for bicycling. Yes, it’s nice to take leisurely strolls among the blooming trees and flowers sprinkled around the city, but it’s also the perfect time to bring out the bike since it’s cool enough to pedal around without breaking a sweat. And since it’s Women’s History Month, it’s especially a good time to hop on the two-wheelers.

When people began riding bicycles in the late 19th century (the first American bikes were manufactured in 1878), early feminists saw them as vehicles of freedom. In 1896, Susan B. Anthony said:

Mumsnet appreciates feminist brilliance. Catharine A. MacKinnon on Gender Crime: a podcast

From: discoverfeminism.com |

There are so many men in the world who could learn a thing or fifty from Catharine A. MacKinnon, about justice, equality, humanity, and the political condition of being a woman. She is, to me, one of the most intellectually, legally, and politically brilliant woman on Earth. I have found all of her work so deeply humane, rooted in reality, committed to justice for women across class and race, and also unwilling to engage in meaningless and needless academic abstractionism for the sake of selling books on theory, as so many "gender theorists" do. So, brava to Ms. MacKinnon!

Groundbreaking political figure Geraldine Ferraro dies

From: discoverfeminism.com |

This past weekend, Geraldine Ferraro, best known for her groundbreaking presence as the Vice-Presidential candidate on the ill-fated 1984 Democratic ticket alongside Walter Mondale, died at age 75. The team lost by a landslide to President Ronald Reagan, but Ferraro’s presence on that ticket was not long forgotten.

NICE WORK: Waiting for Superwoman

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Speaking of Superwoman, today at Framingham State University Stephanie Coontz is coming to campus: that is a highlight! A low light this week, feels like, is the airing of Waiting for Superman – that’s the anti-teachers union documentary that pulls heartstrings, and, as Diane Ravitch discusses in the New York Review of Books, misrepresents a lot about charter schools and teachers unions. A column in the NYRB, no matter how smart, doesn’t have the emotional impact of a documentary. Ravitch summarizes the American disappointment in education that underlies the film, and notes,

The Pink Gang

From: discoverfeminism.com |

In India, there is a particularly bad-ass lady named Sampat Devi Pal, the head of the gulabi gang, which means pink gang in Hindi – so named after the bright pink sari the group’s members wear. The Pink Gang is supposedly the largest women’s vigilante group in the world.

Sisters lost this week, RIP

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Four inspiring women have left us in the space of the past week. Diana Wynne Jones, acclaimed British fantasy author, lost her life on Saturday at 76. Jean Jennings Bartik, one of the ENIAC technicians, died on Wednesday at 86.  Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman to run on the national ticket of a major (US political) party, passed away on Saturday at 75*.  Elizabeth Taylor, actress and advocate for gay rights, took her final curtain call on Wednesday at 79, outliving the author of her obituary and turning up to her own funeral 15 minutes late, by request.

Diana Wynne Jones, 1934-2011

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I’m sorry to have to tell you that Diana Wynne Jones, the much-loved British fantasy author, has just lost her life to cancer. According to her official website, she has two forthcoming books; it’s strange to think that new things are going to come from her even though she is gone. And, of course, new readers will benefit from her legacy even as old fans revisit her work.

Geraldine Ferraro Dies at Age 75

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The NYT has the story here. Ms. Ferraro was the first woman nominated by a major party as a Vice Presidential candidate.  She was Walter Mondale’s running mate in 1984.

The Feministing Five: Carl Siciliano

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Carl Siciliano is the founder and Executive Director of the Ali Forney Center, New York City’s only shelter for homeless LGBTQ youth. There are an estimated 3,000 homeless youth in New York City alone, and 40% of them identify as LGBTQ. Yet there are only 200 beds in the entire US designated for LGBTQ youth, and 57 of them are at the Ali Forney Center.

On beauty and love, in the wake of Liz Taylor’s passing

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Elizabeth Taylor has passed away. In addition to a famous and much-celebrated movie star, she was an HIV/AIDS activist and ally to the LGBT community who helped a lot of poor people of color.

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