Feminist Theory Archives

What Does Feminism Mean?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Last Saturday, I posed the question “what does it mean to be pro-choice?”  Today I want to ask you all what feminism means to you. I first started calling myself a feminist when I was fifteen.  This was back in 1995, and it was my sophomore year of high school.  In 1995, Hillary Clinton spoke

Self-Righteousness, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Celebrity Gossip: Why Jezebel Is Ultimately Bad For The Feminist Movement

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Like many other young feminists, I have been reading Jezebel for a few years now. I’ve never been a “Jezzie,” or a frequent commenter and community member, but I found myself logging on frequently to get the scoop on good feminist news and opinion.In between articles on access to birth control and the rape culture,

Different Perspectives Part One

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I think the real reason I like to read Ayn Rand’s writing is because she has an opposing outlook and differentiating values than me. Please bear with me. I haven’t read enough of Ayn Rand’s philosophy to get a good grasp on the concepts. But my main focus in this post is how I like to embrace the points of view that differ with mine and use those paradigms to become familiar with the text. From what I’ve gathered from Ayn Rand’s philosophy (however limited), man has achieved great things and it is fantastic that man controls nature. We are smarter than our creator. From a Neopagan perspective, nature is very important. It’s the stuff that we have come from. It’s beautiful yet dangerous (but mostly harmless. Sorry, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy joke).

What’s a nice girl like me doing in a place like this?: women in philosophy

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The ivory tower is certainly not considered the bastion of progressive thinking, despite the fact that students are often integral to many of the world’s great revolutions and social movements. Of the many and varied disciplines in graduate study, many are beginning to integrate race/class/gender analysis into their canons. Thank goodness (actually, we should thank feminism and racial and economic justice movements).

Impersonal Feminism: Review of Walby’s “The Future of Feminism”

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Jessica Crispin reviews The Future of Feminism by Sylvia Walby over at The Smart Set:

Thank You, Slutwalk

From: discoverfeminism.com |

July 31 marks the one-year anniversary of the night I was raped. On August 6, I will be participating in Slutwalk when it comes to Philly. They could not have picked a better date. I find it ironic that the very word that kept me from getting any help that night a year ago is now the very same word that is saving me.

The different kinds of feminists there are

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Given the last time Jos noticed Thought Catalog existed was when they published an article about Slutwalks that began, “I’ve never really understood feminism,” it’s pretty obvious their list of the 6 types of feminists is an attempt to bait the Joyless Pseudo-Intellectual Feminists.

New Issue of “Feminist Collections”

From: discoverfeminism.com |

From Phyllis Holman Weisbard, the Women’s Studies Librarian at the University of Wisconsin, a new issue of Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women’s Studies Resources. Content is accessible via direct subscription or the GenderWatch database (not all University libraries have access, though, so check with your local institution).

Academic feminists pay my mortgage

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Much has been said and written about the academic-activist feminist divide. Some of us, such as our very own Samhita, have written about the ways in which academic feminism actually serves as a site of transformation. Others, including myself, have expressed feeling alienated by some of the more esoteric language and theoretical posturing that goes on in academic circles. Both experiences beg questions like: what are the benefits and risks of establishing feminism as an academic discourse? How can academic feminism resist and transform the (often sexist, often racist, often classist) academy itself? Who is the intended audience for feminist theory?

Applying intersectionality in practice

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Intersectionality is, very roughly speaking, the idea that different systems of oppression (such as racism and sexism) can't be dealt with in isolation: these systems interlink. It's a bit of feminist jargon which gets used frequently in blogs and theoretical discussions. But the Central American Women's Network has put together a great toolkit on how organisations in Latin America and the UK are applying this theory in reality. This is a follow-on from an earlier report by CAWN, Intersecting Violences, which looked at violence against women and poverty.

Review: Feminism for Real

From: discoverfeminism.com |

If you’ve ever been burned out by Women’s Studies classes, confused by the feminist blogosphere’s intellectually elitist hierarchies, or rendered invisible by mainstream media depictions of What A Feminist Looks Like™, we should talk about it. For many of us, we don’t know where to start talking, or how, or even to whom we should address the issues of inequality which plague so many feminist and social justice movements: racism, sexism, ableism, classism, homophobia, ageism, cissupremacy, colonialism – a mere sampling from the makings of kyriarchy and the treacherous systems of domination and subordination which police our identities, our privileges and our oppressions. Jessica Yee’s Feminism FOR REAL: Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism is an unflinching, complex look at how capital-F feminism has oppressed, silenced, and maligned people on the margins of society.

And We’re Still Discussing Marx WHY? For those who don’t already, practice this: Indigenist Feminism

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Various significant philosophers--women all of them--have far more important analyses of men's political economies, social relations, and oppression of the masses than Karl Marx. Here are three of them: Vandana Shiva, Marimba Ani, and Catharine MacKinnon.

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