Fantasy heroines Archives

Cthulhu!

From: discoverfeminism.com |

It’s sad really. The only way for me to come in contact with the Cthulhu Cult or H.P Lovecraft was through Satanism. And here I am no further than I was ages ago during my summer with Satan. I wanted to blog a little about Cthulhu and how he and his Cult can tie in philosophy or even religion [for that matter]. So if you haven’t read H.P Lovecraft’s story Call of Cthulhu I’ll give you a rough summary. Basically these out of this world beings have died off deep in the sea, but Cthulhu [the Priest according to the Cultists worshipping the Old Ones] is supposed to give a big announcement of the coming…through dreaming of course.

Sextified Starfire

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Okay, I know that this has been going on in the Geek girl world but honestly I didn’t realize that it was this Starfire who was being sexed up. Until now…. [Important: read the links, please] I loved watching Teen Titans when it came out, but why sextify Starfire? Oh yea, I forgot DC owns Starfire so all that she is going to do is sit on the beach and wave her hair all around and ask for sex. Nice role model.

Feminist (and storytelling) lessons for comic book artists via costume redesign

From: discoverfeminism.com |

If you could redesign the costumes of the major superheroines, what would you change? Complaints about how female superheros are represented in comics are hackneyed. But the issue has been resuscitated after a particularly ludicrous, 'sexy', reinvention of the characters Cat Woman and Starfire by DC. To encapsulate the problem, fantasy writer Michele Lee showed the re-bootyed version to her seven-year-old daughter, who is a major fan of Starfire as she appears in the Teen Titans series. Go read that if you're in need of a refresher course on what is wrong with much superheroine design.

Rants of a Gamer Girl: Kotaku’s Woman Problem

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Gawker has 8 different blogs, each with a different focused topic.  Kotaku is Gawker’s gaming blog, and it’s little surprise that they also have a bit of a problem when it comes to women.  While in recent months the site has semi-frequently posted about the issues that women in gaming face, and the misogyny that’s usually allowed to run freely, their comment moderation shows a serious case of hypocrisy on the part of the editors.

An Ode to Video Games – Well, Maybe Not an *Ode*

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Oh, yes. My commodore 64. Circa 1989 you would have found me hunched over my C64 coding early video games and saving them on to a cassette tape. I loved video games from the beginning and I still own a working version of every console I ever played on. And I’m not picky either. I’ve played everything from Civ to Rainbow Six to Phoenix Wright.

So Stoked for New Elder Scrolls!!!!

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Skyrim is going to be fucking awesome!!! I am super excited about the new Bethesda game. Fallout was amazing when I got used to first person shooter mode. Love at first  shot! Oblivion was my beginner game into the world of role-playing, not that Dungeons and Dragons bullshit. The graphics in Skyrim are going to be awesome compared to Oblivion, just see the comparisons.

Justice League, Geek Feminism style

From: discoverfeminism.com |

With DC rebooting their entire universe, it’s not entirely surprising that I’ve seen a lot of Justice League links of late. Here’s three that I think Geek Feminism readers might find interesting, put together in one post.

Comic-Con Recap: Oh, You Sexy Geek!

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I went to Comic-Con this year; on Thursday, I attended a panel titled “Oh, You Sexy Geek!” a discussion of the implications of “sexy women” in geek/nerd culture, and how that may or may not be used to pander to men.  The panel consisted of moderator Katrina Hill and panelists Clare Kramer, Adrianne Curry, Bonnie Burton, Jennifer Stuller, Chris Gore (who almost no-showed), Clare Grant, Kiala Kazabee, and Jill Pantozzi.

New Review: Y: The Last Man, by Maura McHugh

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The premise of Y: The Last Man is simple: on a summer day in 2002, every mammal with a Y chromosome in the world dies at the same moment from a mysterious plague. The only exceptions in this universe, conceived by US writer Brian K. Vaughan and Canadian artist Pia Guerra, are Yorick Brown and Ampersand, the male Capuchin monkey he is training. Yorick, an amateur escape artist who was drifting in jobless limbo in New York before the plague, is only interested in reuniting with his girlfriend Beth, who is stranded in Australia.

An Ode to Hermione Granger: In Four Parts

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Incredulously: “You’re Hermione Granger” – Yes, I think in a British accent that would work splendidly.  Hermione could easily be the star of Griffandor,  Hogwarts, and the wizarding community at large. But, her role as side kick and best bud to legend Harry Potter is not diminished by her lack of mythical world stardom because Hermione is a star, perhaps not to the wizarding community, but she is to her friends, her community and the real muggle world at large.

Quick hit: Shepard ain’t white: Playing with race and gender in Mass Effect

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I’m going to admit, I haven’t played Mass Effect 2, but I’ve definitely been hearing good things about playing the main character as a woman. There’s lots of good reasons your leading lady may be awesome, but I was particularly taken by this description of how privilege plays a role in making this fun and maybe a little subversive:

The personal is political: princess parties

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Yesterday was my goddaughter’s sixth birthday. She loves princesses and her favorite color is pink. She alternated between a princess dress and a swimming suit with princesses on it. Even her stuffed animal kitty was dressed up like a princess, tiara and all. There was a princess pinata. You can imagine the ways in which these realities provoked some major gender analysis buzz in my head.

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