Porn Politics Archives

On Tera Myers and the Anti-Porn Folk

From: discoverfeminism.com |

I always read questions like Charlie Glickman’s ‘Where are the anti-porn folks?’ as ‘Where are the feminists?’. Rather than a call to arms, it’s a calling-out of the hypocrisy of being anti-porn and seeking to end the sex industry, while being totally absent from the defence of women who have voluntarily left the industry when they later face repercussions. Women’s sexual history is not allowed, in Society, to be their professional history. Women are apparently expected (regardless of circumstance or personal ambition) to forever set up camp on a bourgeois moral high ground which is utterly disconnected from the price tags attached to pursuing dreams, goals, financial independence, or sustenance, shelter or income.

Recommended (Non-Naughty) Reading on Porn

From: discoverfeminism.com |

One possible sign of a socially progressing society: A robust, multi-perspective online conversation about pornography led by women. Perhaps it’s the product of this mercilessly cold winter we’re knee-deep in, but women seem to have porn on the brain. A number of posts and articles on pornography and its relationship with gender dynamics, feminism and bedroom politics have popped up in the past couple weeks, and they’re well worth a look.

Julia Hörnle, “Countering the Dangers of Online Pornography – Shrewd Regulation of Lewd Content?”

From: discoverfeminism.com |

This Article will detail how the UK has responded to the greater risks posed by illegal online content by successively extending the reach of the substantive criminal laws and by taking preventative measures. It will focus on the example of laws on obscene content on the internet and associated online behaviour and in particular on the ‘grooming’ offences, the law on extreme pornography and virtual child abuse images.

Playboy TV offers “female-friendly” porn to appeal to couples

From: discoverfeminism.com |

The New York Times reports that Playboy TV is looking to turn on the ladies now—or at least the straight ladies…with boyfriends. The subscription channel has decided it can’t compete with the plethora of hard-core porn readily available on the internet and, come January, is looking to appeal to women by offering higher-quality porn, featuring “real chemistry, non-enhanced body parts, varied body shapes and ‘contextualized’ sex.”

The Wicked Wretch of the East (US), Bob Guccione, is dead at age 79.

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Bob Guccione, who died Wednesday 20 October 2010, at the age 79, was what might be termed one of several infamous U.S. pimperors, or rulers of pornography empires that trafficked in women and made exploitation and objectification into "sex" for heterosexual male consumers. He was the founder of Penthouse, a magazine of pornography (literally, the graphic depiction of 'whores') which started in England in 1965 and arrived in the U.S. in the late 1960s becoming tremendously popular and profitable through the 1970s and 1980s. It was Hugh Hefner's Playboy magazine's main rival for years.

Speaking of Doin’ It Whilst Feminist:

From: discoverfeminism.com |

You know who is frequently called upon to make their sexual practices more in line with someone else’s personal idea of What Feminism Means For Us All? Why, the porn ladies and gentlemen, that is who! And whilst you were all preparing to yell at Don this weekend (oh, like you thought he WOULDN’T end up with the secretary; “boring yet somehow deeply unlikable” is how Mad Men spells W-I-F-E) I was learning a whole bunch of stuff about condoms, porn, and California. Enjoy!

I Can Never Tell

From: discoverfeminism.com |

This guest post is by Thomas MacAulay Millar, feminist, kinkster, litigator and essayist. He blogs regularly at The Yes Means Yes Blog and is a frequent contributor to Feministe. I don’t buy porn from any of the big companies that make BDSM porn. It’s not that I have a problem with consenting adults making depictions of sexually explicit conduct for the purpose of arousing viewers. In concept, I’m a fan of some writers who also make porn, and I’m friends with a few people who make or have made porn. And when it’s my friends, I’ll watch as much of it as I can get, because I have some certainty about what kind of experience they had.

Glamour wants to know if you’re normal about porn. So are you?

From: discoverfeminism.com |

So another Glamour article caught my eye this month and got me thinking. “Are You Normal About Porn?” lists a number of statistics collected from a Glamour poll asking female readers how they regard the genre, and these are the findings:

Teaching Resource on Feminism and Pornography

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Those who teach Feminist Legal Theory or other classes in which pornography is a subject of academic discussion might be interested in this recording of an interview by Professor Gail Dines (Wheelock College) with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.  Professor Dines is the author Pornland: How Porn has Hijacked our Sexuality. Here is the CBC's description of the program:

Portland is "Pornland" and Strip Club-City and that requires Pimps Sexually Buying, Renting, and Trafficking Girls: A True Story of Prostitution and Pimping from Nightline

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Please keep in mind what you are about to see is a story that doesn't include the most poor and most marginalised girls and women globally or even in North America who are lured or captured by pimps and slavers. The story you're about to watch is "the nicer end" of the spectrum of how pimps and slavers operate. It's the end that pro-pimp, pro-procurement activists and advocates claim is liberating for women and ought to be legally considered "free speech" or a "civil liberty". Just one question: Speech and liberty for which groups of oppressed people?

Gay Literature, Gay Pornography, Gay Sex and what that all has to do with WHM supremacy

From: discoverfeminism.com |

What follows is occasionally sexually graphic and discusses some pornography, but not much. I've grown weary of reading any "gay lit" that insists of focusing on cock size or pornographic descriptions of sexual acts. (Of the white gay authors I know of, I'm pretty much left with Augusten Burroughs. And of course there's always James Baldwin.) I don't really consider pornography to be depicting any kind of sex I want to participate in, which is why I'm not anti-sex but am anti-sexxxism.

The Great Porn Debate

From: discoverfeminism.com |

Pornography: one of the great dividing points in the feminist movement. Is it good? Is it bad? Do anti-porn feminists feel uncomfortable getting in bed with the Religious Right? Do sex-positive pro-porn (or "erotica") feminists get a funny feeling about objectification?

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